Farm Sanctuary

URGENT ALERT: Farm Sanctuary has seized 24 starving pigs from a property in Cattaraugus County, New York. Many more are still in desperate need. 
Please donate today.

 

Dear friend of farm animals,

I’ve just returned with 24 of the sickest pigs who were suffering on a property in Cattaraugus County, NY.

I’ve been to this property before. In 2003, Farm Sanctuary rescued more than 100 pigs from the same hideous place. The abuser had left the pigs outside in freezing weather without shelter. Some of the pigs had actually frozen to the ground. 

That rescue has haunted me for 15 years. But this one — same place, same abuser — is worse. Please help.

Instead of being left outside, more than 85 pigs were trapped inside sheds, barns, and trailers. The barns were completely windowless. The pigs locked inside had spent their lives in total darkness. The air was so thick with ammonia that my eyes immediately burned. I couldn’t stand to be inside for even a few minutes. I cannot imagine what it was like to live in there.

Cages had been built around the pigs so that they could barely move. We needed a crowbar to get some of them out! They stood in a deep layer of their own feces and, on the rare occasion that these pigs were given food (many weigh less than half of what they should), they had to eat it off the top of the filth. 

Our rescue team took 24 of the most desperate animals to Farm Sanctuary, where they are receiving emergency care. Three of them are now in the ICU at Cornell University’s Nemo Farm Animal Hospital. We are stretched to capacity and there are still pigs on the site that need to be removed and placed in adoptive homes. We are in urgent need of resources, which is why I am turning to you for help.

Among the rescued is a litter of newborn piglets. They were born on Tuesday and by the time we arrived on Wednesday, eight of the seventeen babies were already dead. The remaining nine are touch-and-go. One baby boy, whom we’re calling Arlo, will likely not live to see his mother again. He has been taken to Cornell, where veterinarians are trying to save him. If he can be stabilized, he will still need surgery on his foot in order to be able to walk. Some people might say Arlo isn’t worth saving. But I have held this newborn in the palm of my hand, and I will not give up on him. I hope you won’t either. He has never even seen the light of day!

URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate   URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate
     

Please help Farm Sanctuary during this emergency rescue situation. Pigs are among the most expensive animals to rescue. Given the number of pigs involved and the severity of their abuse, we estimate that this rescue could cost upwards of $100,000. The cost of ongoing care, transportation to adoptive homes, and other needs for these pigs and the over 1,000 animals we already have at our sanctuaries is significant. We cannot do it without friends like you. 

There is a lot to do just in the next 24 hours. We’re examining every pig we rescued and assessing their illnesses and injuries. So far, they all have pneumonia and some of the most severe cases of mange I have ever seen on pigs. They are coughing and scratching. They look and sound horrible. The pigs we removed are also all significantly underweight, but some are still too sick to have strong appetites. 

For many of them, starvation and dehydration are the greatest threats to their survival. I have never seen pigs drink the way these did when we got them to safety. It was like they had never had any real access to water. As for the starvation, some of the pigs are so emaciated you can see their ribs and pelvic bones protruding under their mange-covered skin.

URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate   Pig group photo 2.jpg
     

Just looking at these pigs makes me angry that anyone would ever treat a living animal this way. But to think that their abuser has done this before is infuriating.

As you can imagine, Farm Sanctuary is helping authorities with their investigation and we hope that this repeat offender will face criminal charges. Last time, he pled guilty to nine counts of cruelty to animals and was sentenced to three years during which he could not own or harbor animals. Obviously, three years was not enough.

I will keep you informed of the investigation, but right now I can only think about saving these pigs — and I need your help to do it.

Please donate now to help Farm Sanctuary during this crisis and ensure that we can continue to be the rescuer and caregiver for farm animals in need.

And please, if you ever see a farm animal in danger (and I hope you never do), I urge you to contact Farm Sanctuary immediately so that we can help. No animal should ever suffer the way these pigs are suffering now.

With great urgency,

[object Object]
Susie Coston
National Shelter Director

P.S. This emergency is moving quickly and I will keep you informed of what happens next. My best hope is that we will be able to save the pigs we have seized from the property, rescue more of the desperate animals, and work with authorities to make sure that this abuser can never hurt another animal. If you can help, I urge you to do so now.

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Farm Sanctuary | PO Box 150, Watkins Glen, NY 14891 | 607-583-2225
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Farm Sanctuary

URGENT ALERT: Farm Sanctuary has seized 24 starving pigs from a property in Cattaraugus County, New York. Many more are still in desperate need. 
Please donate today.

 

Dear friend of farm animals,

I’ve just returned with 24 of the sickest pigs who were suffering on a property in Cattaraugus County, NY.

I’ve been to this property before. In 2003, Farm Sanctuary rescued more than 100 pigs from the same hideous place. The abuser had left the pigs outside in freezing weather without shelter. Some of the pigs had actually frozen to the ground. 

That rescue has haunted me for 15 years. But this one — same place, same abuser — is worse. Please help.

Instead of being left outside, more than 85 pigs were trapped inside sheds, barns, and trailers. The barns were completely windowless. The pigs locked inside had spent their lives in total darkness. The air was so thick with ammonia that my eyes immediately burned. I couldn’t stand to be inside for even a few minutes. I cannot imagine what it was like to live in there.

Cages had been built around the pigs so that they could barely move. We needed a crowbar to get some of them out! They stood in a deep layer of their own feces and, on the rare occasion that these pigs were given food (many weigh less than half of what they should), they had to eat it off the top of the filth. 

Our rescue team took 24 of the most desperate animals to Farm Sanctuary, where they are receiving emergency care. Three of them are now in the ICU at Cornell University’s Nemo Farm Animal Hospital. We are stretched to capacity and there are still pigs on the site that need to be removed and placed in adoptive homes. We are in urgent need of resources, which is why I am turning to you for help.

Among the rescued is a litter of newborn piglets. They were born on Tuesday and by the time we arrived on Wednesday, eight of the seventeen babies were already dead. The remaining nine are touch-and-go. One baby boy, whom we’re calling Arlo, will likely not live to see his mother again. He has been taken to Cornell, where veterinarians are trying to save him. If he can be stabilized, he will still need surgery on his foot in order to be able to walk. Some people might say Arlo isn’t worth saving. But I have held this newborn in the palm of my hand, and I will not give up on him. I hope you won’t either. He has never even seen the light of day!

URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate   URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate
     

Please help Farm Sanctuary during this emergency rescue situation. Pigs are among the most expensive animals to rescue. Given the number of pigs involved and the severity of their abuse, we estimate that this rescue could cost upwards of $100,000. The cost of ongoing care, transportation to adoptive homes, and other needs for these pigs and the over 1,000 animals we already have at our sanctuaries is significant. We cannot do it without friends like you. 

There is a lot to do just in the next 24 hours. We’re examining every pig we rescued and assessing their illnesses and injuries. So far, they all have pneumonia and some of the most severe cases of mange I have ever seen on pigs. They are coughing and scratching. They look and sound horrible. The pigs we removed are also all significantly underweight, but some are still too sick to have strong appetites. 

For many of them, starvation and dehydration are the greatest threats to their survival. I have never seen pigs drink the way these did when we got them to safety. It was like they had never had any real access to water. As for the starvation, some of the pigs are so emaciated you can see their ribs and pelvic bones protruding under their mange-covered skin.

URGENT RESCUE NOW: 80+ pigs desperate   Pig group photo 2.jpg
     

Just looking at these pigs makes me angry that anyone would ever treat a living animal this way. But to think that their abuser has done this before is infuriating.

As you can imagine, Farm Sanctuary is helping authorities with their investigation and we hope that this repeat offender will face criminal charges. Last time, he pled guilty to nine counts of cruelty to animals and was sentenced to three years during which he could not own or harbor animals. Obviously, three years was not enough.

I will keep you informed of the investigation, but right now I can only think about saving these pigs — and I need your help to do it.

Please donate now to help Farm Sanctuary during this crisis and ensure that we can continue to be the rescuer and caregiver for farm animals in need.

And please, if you ever see a farm animal in danger (and I hope you never do), I urge you to contact Farm Sanctuary immediately so that we can help. No animal should ever suffer the way these pigs are suffering now.

With great urgency,

[object Object]
Susie Coston
National Shelter Director

P.S. This emergency is moving quickly and I will keep you informed of what happens next. My best hope is that we will be able to save the pigs we have seized from the property, rescue more of the desperate animals, and work with authorities to make sure that this abuser can never hurt another animal. If you can help, I urge you to do so now.

SHARE THIS EMAIL

Twitter - Gray Facebook - grey email - grey

Farm Sanctuary | PO Box 150, Watkins Glen, NY 14891 | 607-583-2225
Farm Sanctuary's financial report and state registration information.

If you have trouble viewing this alert, please use this link: Message Viewer

Click here to change your email preferences or to unsubscribe.

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